Veronica Mars Book Review: Mostly Perfect, Marshmallows

Be warned: This review contains mild spoilers for the movie and, obviously, for this book. No big reveals here, but be warned that if you aren’t caught up to the movie, you’ll be spoiled on a few counts.

18209454By now, I’m betting you know what they say about Veronica Mars. She’s a marshmallow, and now a grown-up one, at that.

I’ve been a VMars fan for a few years now, having watched the whole show twice now and seeing the movie on opening weekend. Knowing this book was coming was just the cherry on top of what has so far been a spectacular sundae. I disclose this so that you know this is a review from a fan, so I won’t be saying much about its accessibility to non-fans but rather more about its place in canon. For what it’s worth, though, this book puts forth a strong effort into recapping the final events of the movie (so, obviously, spoilers galore in the first chapter) but introducing everyone in a way that says, “You should probably know who this is if you’re reading this book, but if you don’t, here’s who they are in relation to Veronica.”

Post-NYC Veronica has moved home to not only care for a recovering Keith Mars, but to effectively take over Mars Investigations in the meantime. As it turns out, running a private investigation company while paying a techy assistant (Mac, obviously) and yourself a living wage is harder than Veronica expected. I mean, there was a reason she always worked for her dad in high school, right?

That all changes when one of the most powerful women in town hires Veronica to discreetly figure out what happened to a college woman who vanished during Spring Break season. As Sheriff Dan Lamb (still in office, somehow) dismisses the case, assuming she’ll just show up on her own, another girl disappears and Veronica doubles down to solve the case before Lamb can. As always, Veronica loops in her friends to help her figure out exactly what’s happening and who’s really behind these disappearances. Additionally, there’s an element of crime families, as always, which seems to be Rob Thomas’s kryptonite. That said, it’s nice to see that the advantages a book gives were really taken here, as far as expanded plot and world-building.

I really liked this book. I read the whole book in one evening, as it turns out. I reserve reading time exclusively for my commute (which still means I read for about 90 minutes every day), but for this, I broke my rule. I needed to know what happened and I needed to be able to have my own reactions in my own time and space. If anyone does a storytelling punch to the gut with gusto, it’s Rob Thomas. This was no letdown, filled with the twists and turns we’ve come to expect from the cases Veronica gets involved with. On the whole, I think this book was a grand success, and I’m excited to see that the Neptune world is getting a little bigger with every development.

However, there were some noticeable plot developments (or absence of) that really threw me for a loop. Remember how at the end of the movie Logan was being deployed for a few months? Well, the thing about Logan being gone is that he effectively doesn’t exist in Veronica’s life. Or, well, he does, but she doesn’t have to deal with the problems that have always plagued their relationship while he’s away. They Skype a couple of times in the book, which I guess gets him into the movie sequel, but honestly, it felt like a major cop-out that Veronica basically is in a relationship with her romanticized version of Logan. We know that Logan has grown up, and I assume that the military has really shaped him as a person, but he and Veronica haven’t spoken in almost a decade—and as we all know, people do change from ages twenty to thirty. As much as the relationship was built up in the movie, it really fell to the wayside in the book. And honestly, I wasn’t expecting a lot of love story in the book, but I was hoping that Veronica and Logan would have to deal with the challenges of what true love means and how to function in an adult version of a relationship that previously has not gone as well as anyone hoped.

I don’t want to spoil anyone for anything else, so I’ll leave out what I consider to be one of the biggest surprise returns of the book, but know that we haven’t seen the last of everyone you might have thought was long gone.

At times, I felt like the book relied a little too much on tropes like the popular idea of college spring break more than it should have, but as this is a first book, it makes sense that it wouldn’t be as finely tuned as an episode of the show, or the movie. Sometimes a character we love would say something that felt not quite right or in character. But when in a visual medium you have actors and their interpretations to bulk up your script, in a book you only have yourself and the words you’ve put down.

Though at times I felt like it could have been stronger, I feel really good about this book. It’s smart, quippy, and keeps you guessing until the end, with Veronica putting two and two together at the last minute, as always. Everyone comes back to play in this one, and it’s worth every penny. This is a really strong first effort, and I think the next one will only be better. Buy this one so there can be a next one.

As far as for how this book fits into canon, I find it to be a really interesting quandary. It’s clearly a direct follow-up to the movie, but I suspect that if there’s a film sequel, it won’t match up with the book exactly. The audience is never exactly the same, and beyond the stark absence of Logan, it deals almost not at all with the current corruption in the Sheriff’s office. These are two main plot points of the first movie, and I doubt they’d let it go for a sequel. However, the main mystery of the book would be a nice plot for a movie, and honestly would probably be more of what non-fans are looking for, given that it has a mystery that doesn’t circle around characters from the TV show. As always, the Veronica Mars team is breaking new ground in storytelling, and while I think they’ll have a challenge reconciling it all, I suspect they’re more than up to it.

On sale TODAY, 3/25/14, from your favorite local retailer–buy it now! PS If you’re interested, Kristen Bell recorded the audio book, so give that a listen, too.

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